Dealing with Itchy Eyes

You know the feeling—spring hits, your eyelids get puffy, and your eyes start to water and itch so badly that it’s almost unbearable. Your eyes may also make mucus that accumulates on your eyeball, obscuring your vision. The mucus may build up at night, leaving you...

What’s Causing My Hives?

One of the telltale signs of an allergic reaction is inflammation. When the lining of the nose swells, you get nasal congestion. When the throat swells, you get wheezing. When the skin swells, you get rashes such as eczema and hives. Hives are one of the more common...

Primary Care Physicians Can Now Offer Allergy Immunotherapy

At least 20 percent of Americans have some type of allergy, and many would benefit from allergy immunotherapy. If you are a primary care physician, you have most likely tried treating your allergic and asthmatic patients with antihistamines, steroids, and other...

Are Tree Pollens Getting to You?

If you have been sniffling and sneezing with the onset of spring or dealing with a sore throat or itchy eyes, tree allergies may have gotten to you. Trees start blooming as early as February in many parts of the country and may keep up their mischief well into May....

Food Allergy Treatment

Eating should be fun—not perilous. And yet, for people with food allergies, eating can lead to a whole host of uncomfortable symptoms, some of which are life threatening. Most food allergy sufferers spend mealtimes dodging potentially hazardous foods, but there’s a...

Increase Your Medical Practice Profits

Twenty percent of Americans have allergies. If you’re a primary care physician, that means that roughly one in five of your patients experiences allergy symptoms and may benefit from allergy immunotherapy treatment. A first line of defense against allergies is...